Media Statements

Minister Mkhize to Answer Oral Questions in the National Assembly

MINISTRY FOR COOPERATIVE GOVERNANCE AND TRADITIONAL AFFAIRS

REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

 

 

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

QUESTION FOR ORAL REPLY

QUESTION NUMBER 2019/4

DATE OF PUBLICATION: 25 FEBRUARY 2019

 

Ms N F Shabalala (ANC) to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

What is the current status of the municipalities in the North West province that were placed under section 139 intervention? NO429

 

 

 

 

REPLY:

Madam Speaker/Chairperson,

 

Cabinet imposed a Section 100 intervention on North West province and took over the oversight over the province including the local government sphere and appointed an Inter-Ministerial Committee.

 

The basis for the Section 100 (1) (a) was to build capacity in the provincial Department of COGTA and Human Settlements. A Protocol was signed with the MEC. The previous and current CoGTA MECs have been fully cooperative in the implementation with no obstruction, submitting monthly reports and hosting bilateral meetings with the Minister of COGTA. Similarly the Premier and Exco have been very supportive in their effort to restore good governance.

 

The Provincial Executive Council identified 8 municipalities that require intervention in terms of the Constitution and the Municipal Finance Management Act.

 

The following table presents the municipalities and type of interventions as resolved:

NAME OF A MUNICIPALITY TYPE OF INTERVENTION
1.  Ditsobotla Local Municipality Section 139 (1)(b) of the Constitution
2.  Ramotshere Local Municipality Section 139 (1)(b) of the Constitution
3.  Maquassi Local Municipality Section 139 (1)(b) of the Constitution
4.  Kgetleng-Rivier Local Municipality Section 139 (1)(b) of the Constitution
5.  Kagisano-Molopo Local Municipality Section 139 (1)(b) of the Constitution
6.  Naledi Local Municipality Section 137 of the MFMA
7.  Mahikeng Local Municipality Section 137 of the MFMA and Section 139 (1)(b) of the Constitution
8.  Ngaka Modiri Molema District Municipality Section 137 of the MFMA

 

Four of the eight municipalities have been under Section 139 before in 2009, namely Ditsobohla, Mahikeng, Ngaka Modiri Molema and Naledi. Mahikeng has been under intervention four times, in 2003, 2006 and 2010 and currently.

 

A lot of work is being done in various municipalities to achieve turnarounds.

 

Administrators have been appointed to manage the municipalities. Municipal Recovery Plans have been developed and are currently being implemented to improve governance and administration and financial management.

 

Councillors are being trained about their oversight roles. Local Labour Forum meetings are taking place and Senior Management Teams are being established. Work is being done to normalise relations among the Troikas, (mayor, speaker and chief whip).

 

The municipalities are also being assisted to put Strategic Plans in place and establish ward committees as well to promote local democracy. The appointment of key personnel is critical and among progress made has been the appointment of three senior managers at Ditsobohla, the chief financial officer, Director Local Economic Development and Planning and the Director: Community Services.

 

 

Some of the existing challenges include dealing with vacancy rates, low staff morale, water thefts because of the non-functionality of meters, low revenue collection, and in some cases, drought which affects the delivery of water.

 

We have deployed engineers, town planners and other professionals in some of the municipalities and progress is being made as a result in the delivery and maintenance of infrastructure.

 

Some of the progress includes the following;

  • In Kagisano Molopo LM, MISA funded boreholes are complete and 4000 households have access to water.
  • In Ditsobohla, the refurbishment of the Lichtenburg Waste Treatment Plant is ninety percent complete and the construction of the Coligny waste water treatment plant has also been completed. Teams have been set up to ensure regular maintenance in the sewerage plants in Itsoseng, Blydeville, Boikhutso, Coligny and Biesisvlei.

 

  • Ditsobotla LM has spent R26.2m of their MIG funds and this translates to 73% of their allocation and 91% of amount transferred by end of December 2018. They are position two in the country in terms of MIG expenditure. In Bodibe in Ditsobotla, funded boreholes are completed, and 21 688 population have access to water.
  • Thirty high mast lights and Lotlhakane sports facility have been electrified at nine wards under Mahikeng LM. Approximately 70 000 people are benefiting from the community lighting projects which were white elephants before MISA intervention.
  • Groot Marico WWTW has been electrified by Eskom due to engagements by MISA. This will assist in addressing sewer spillages in the area.
  • Ngaka Modiri Molema District municipality have spent over 42.4% of their 2018/2019 MIG allocation to date due to MISA intervention.
  • The cost reimbursement measure implemented by DCOG and National Treasury has assisted in ensuring MIG funds are not used for operations. This has led to huge improvement in the expenditure in municipality such as Ditsobotla, Ngaka Modiri Molema District, Kgetleng Riverier and Ramotshere Moiloa municipalities.

Cabinet receives regular reports of progress in North West in the local government as well as other spheres with the aim of ensuring a turnaround that improves governance and service delivery in the province.

 

I Thank You.

 

MINISTRY FOR COOPERATIVE GOVERNANCE AND TRADITIONAL AFFAIRS

REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

 

 

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

QUESTIONS FOR ORAL REPLY

QUESTION NUMBER 2019/24

DATE OF PUBLICATION: 25 FEBRUARY 2019

 

QUESTION:

Mr K J Mileham (DA) to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

Whether any progress has been made in reducing the high level s of debt owed by municipalities to Eskom; if so, what are the relevant details? No 449E

 

REPLY

Madam Speaker/Chairperson,

A lot of progress was made last year in dealing with the problem of municipalities that owe Eskom and water boards.

Our position is that we need to find lasting solutions to the problem through strengthening municipalities as short-term solutions such as litigation will not solve the problem in a sustainable manner.

The Eskom debt owed by municipalities was R17.7 billion as at 31 July 2016 and R24.3 billion as at 31 December 2018.

We made progress last year in dealing with the dispute between municipalities and the SA Local Government Association with regards to jurisdiction with regards to the reticulation of electricity. An Inter-Ministerial Task Team was set up to deal with these matters. The recommendations were presented to Cabinet in December last year and Cabinet adopted a framework for resolution of impasse on Eskom debt by municipalities and asked for an implementation plan to be developed.

 

A marked achievement has been to arrive at unanimity amongst Eskom and municipalities to adopt a binding and cooperative approach in resolving the huge debt owed by municipalities and avoid a court battle amongst themselves in line with intergovernmental relations framework.

 

There is now recognition of the constitutional mandate of municipalities for the reticulation and supply of electricity. The interpretation of Constitution means that service delivery agreements need to be drawn to regulate the relationship between municipalities and Eskom.

 

This must take into account the infrastructure investment made by Eskom and the obligations of Eskom as a business to ensure that all services supplied realise the returns. The management of the agreement must also ensure Eskom balance sheet is protected.

 

It was agreed that the restructuring of the Eskom debt has to be looked into. This must be seen in the context of visible efforts by municipalities to honour agreements.

 

The IMTT has recommended the installation of prepaid meters to improve the rate of collection. Existing evidence indicates much higher rates of collection from prepaid meters as compared to conventional meters.

 

The implementation plan must provide for the protection of the indigent population in terms of the free basic services. The different situations applicable to Eskom and water boards must be analysed to avoid a one size fits all approach to the solution.

 

Ultimately, fixing municipalities is critical. COGTA and National Treasury continue to prioritise the municipal recovery plan to ensure that the municipalities are turned around on issues of governance and administration, financial recovery, infrastructure and service delivery. Well-functioning municipalities are capable of collecting revenue and paying debts.

 

The culture of payment must also be promoted by all levels of government and communities to encourage payment for services for res. Illegal connections are to be dismantled and civic education to be promoted for responsible citizenship. A team of DGs as well as Eskom and Water Boards CEOs is finalising an implementation plan for submission to Cabinet in the next four weeks.

 

We are also making progress in dealing with litigation arising from debts owed to Eskom. We appreciate the cooperation of communities and the business sector in areas such as Emalahleni, Maluti a Phofung and other municipalities as they continue to work with government to find lasting solutions to the problems faced by their municipalities.

 

I thank you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MINISTRY FOR COOPERATIVE GOVERNANCE AND TRADITIONAL AFFAIRS

REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

 

 

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

QUESTION FOR ORAL REPLY

QUESTION NUMBER 2019/31

DATE OF PUBLICATION: 25 FEBRUARY 2019

Mr Z R Xalisa (EFF) to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

What was (a) done by his department in its intervention in the 87 municipalities that were identified as distressed and dysfunctional and (b) identified as the main drivers of this dysfunctionality at a local government sphere?NO457E

 

 

 

 

REPLY

Madam speaker/Chairperson,

 

A lot has been done to support municipalities in distress to effect a turnaround.

 

A Memorandum of Understanding was signed between National Treasury and COGTA. Teams were dispatched to the affected municipalities from national and provincial departments. Municipalities were instructed to correct budgets that are not cash-backed. Basic revenue recovery plans were adopted by councils. COGTA identified a number of municipalities needing longer term interventions on governance and financial management. An advertisement was placed for expression of interest by individuals and companies with relevant expertise to be deployed to the identified municipalities. National Treasury and COGTA are in the process of selecting these teams for rapid deployment to achieve urgent turnaround of the affected municipalities within the next few weeks.

 

We have also addressed issues relating to the debts owed to Eskom and Water Boards, the problem of municipalities that invested funds in VBS Bank and the impact on service delivery and challenges with revenue collection.

Beyond promoting good governance, we also focus on improving service delivery so that our people can have water, sanitation, electricity and other important basic services.

 

In August 2018 through the Municipal Infrastructure Support Agent (MISA), COGTA deployed district support teams comprising more than 80 engineers and town planners in 55 out of the 87 identified dysfunctional municipalities. Last Tuesday we welcomed more than 90 young graduates and professionals who have joined MISA as engineers, town and regional planners and environmental specialists. They are being deployed to various municipalities.

 

The 55 municipalities were targeted for technical support due to severe challenges in relation to the delivery of municipal infrastructure for basic services and failure to spend their Municipal Infrastructure Support Grant.

 

Honourable Members we are pleased to indicate that interventions are beginning to bear some fruits.

 

 

 

Of the 87 municipalities, 55 were supported through MISA to address service and infrastructure delivery challenges which manifested themselves in perennial underspending of MIG allocations. Through MISA support, 44 of these municipalities have made significant improvement in performance. This positive change is mainly reflected in improved MIG spending, improvement in revenue collection, filling of vacancies in technical departments, among others.

 

Only 11 of the 55 municipalities were recommended for stopping of MIG allocations for 2018/19 financial year for failing to achieve the 40% spending threshold by end of December 2018. There are some distressed municipalities that have improved and which in our view deserve to be removed from the list of 55 dysfunctional municipalities.

 

 

A total of 24 municipalities have significantly improved in terms of performance since deployment of district support teams.

The table below provides a list of municipalities that have achieve significant improvements in performance.

 

Province Number of Municipalities in the List of 55 No of Improved Municipalities List of Improved Municipalities
Eastern Cape 11 6 Mnquma, Sakhisizwe, Matatiele, Mbizana, OR Tambo
Free State 4 2 Masilonyana, Maluti-a-Phofung
Gauteng 3 2 Lesedi, Rand West City
Kwazulu-Natal 10 7 Mpofana, uMgungundlovu DM, uMvoti, Ndwedwe, Dr Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma, Jozini, Inkosi Langalibalele
Limpopo 7 1 Molemole,
Mpumalanga 3 3 Lekwa, Govan Mbeki, Nkangala
Northern Cape 7 1 Kareeberg
North West 6 2 Ditsobotla, Ngaka Modiri Molema
Western Cape 4 1 Laingsburg
Totals 55 24  

 

The municipalities have made improvements with regards to the following;

  • The spending the Municipal Infrastructure Grant allocations.
  • Filling of critical technical positions and those of senior management.
  • Improvements in revenue collection through the introduction of revenue enhancement strategies.
  • The development and implementation of water conservation and demand management plans in some municipalities such as Matatiele, Kou Kama, Mose Kotane, Mafube, Letsemeng, uMzinyathi, Ugu and Abaqulusi.
  • The right-sizing of municipal establishments.
  • Removal of unaffordable supernumerary employees.
  • Removal of inappropriately qualified officials.
  • Firm stand on fraud and corruption including consequent management and stronger role for Municipal Public Accounts Committees.

 

The Auditor General’s 2016/17 report mentions a few contributors to the distressed state of municipalities which we have sought to address. These include vacancies and instability in key positions and inadequate skills levels.

 

Lack of consequence management, poor internal controls, poor or lack of support by provincial and national government are among the reasons.

 

Another key factor is political infighting at council level and interference in the administration which weakened oversight and service delivery. As Minister I have engaged political leaders at various levels to confront these issues.

 

Our Municipal Recovery Programme is moving very well and while challenges still remain in various municipalities, we are happy with the progress we have made thus far.

 

I Thank You.

 

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

       Type of Support Municipalities supported
Interventions to improve MIG expenditure and service delivery

•      Technical support on the upgrading of infrastructure

•      Project / contract management support

•      Town Planning / Spatial & Development Planning Support

•      Assistance in the compilation of ‘sector plans’ (master plans, water conservation and demand management, etc.)

•      Operations and maintenance support

•      In August 2018 MISA deployed teams of more than 80 engineers and town planners in 55 out of the 87 identified distressed or dysfunctional municipalities.

The focus of these teams is to build capacity of these municipalities to plan, deliver, operate and maintain infrastructure.

•      Engagements with these municipalities are currently under way with a view to review remedial measures to possibly prevent the stopping.

•      Allocations for municipalities unable to achieve the spending threshold they will be re-allocated to the district municipality as per agreement with the National Treasury.

•      In the event of that district mechanism not working, we are also looking at invoking Section 20/21 of the Division of Revenue Act (DORA) and convert the grant into an indirect grant and appoint an implementing agent to manage it on their behalf.

Alfred Nzo, Enoch Mgijima, Makana, Dr Beyers Naudè, Port St Johns, Matatiele, Mbizana, Mnquma, Amahlathi, Maluti-a-Phofung, Mafube, Letsemeng, Emfuleni, Lesedi, Rand West City, West Rand District, Msunduzi, Abaqalusi, Jozini, Mpofana, Inkosi Langalibalele, Dr Nkosazana Zuma, uMzinyathi, Mopani District, Sekhukhune District, Thabazimbi, Molemole, Modimolle-Mookgophong, Lekwa, Emalahleni, Govan Mbeki, Ngaka Modiri Molema, Madibeng, Moses Kotane, Ditsobotla, Kgetlengrivier, Kareeberg, Siyancuma, Tsantsabane, Joe Morolong, Beaufort West, Kannaland
Interventions to improve revenue collection such as:

•      Revenue enhancement strategies

•      Policy and by-law reviews

•      Review and assessment of IDP’s and relevance to service delivery

Inxuba YeThemba, Raymond Mhlaba, Joe Gqabi, Letsemeng, Endumeni, uMzimkhulu, Ray Nkonyeni, Alfred Duma, Molemole, Kgetlengrivier, Tswaing, Nama Khoi, Emthanjeni, Cederberg
Interventions to address governance challenges:

·      Cross functional technical task teams were established to support administrators in municipalities under section 139 interventions

·      Ministerial /MEC visits to embattled municipalities and discussions with leadership

King Sabata Dalindyebo, Walter Sisulu, Maluti-a-Phofung, Masilonyana, Nketoana, Mpofana, Dr Nkosazana Zuma, eDumbe, eMadlangeni, Ray Nkonyeni, Collins Chabane (LIM 345), Vhembe, Fetakgomo-Tubatse, Moretele,
Interventions to improve financial management in financially distressed municipalities:

·      Coordination of Financial Recovery plan development support and monitoring by National and Provincial Treasuries

·      Task teams with community organisations to implement financial recovery plans

Makana, Dr Beyers Naude, Mnquma, Raymond Mhlaba, Inxuba Ye Themba, Enoch Mgijima, Matatiele, Alfred Nzo, Port St Johns,   Maluti-a-Phofung, King Sabata Dalindyebo, Walter Sisulu, Joe Gqabi, Nketoana, Letsemeng, Lesedi, Emfuleni, Merafong, Mogale City, Rand West City, uMlalazi, Amajuba, uMkhanyakude, Mopani Dsitrict, Greater Giyani, Modimolle-Mookgophong, Vhembe, Lekwa, Thaba Chweu, Emalahleni, Tswaing, City of Matlosana, Siyathemba, Renosterberg, Ubuntu, Tsantsabane, Kannaland, Central Karoo, Laingsburg

 

Ends

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MINISTRY FOR COOPERATIVE GOVERNANCE AND TRADITIONAL AFFAIRS

REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

 

 

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

QUESTIONS FOR ORAL REPLY

QUESTION NUMBER 2019/30

DATE OF PUBLICATION: 25 FEBRUARY 2019

 

Mr N Ngwezi (IFP) to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

Whether his department has put any measures in place to remedy the situation of the Government departments that still owe monies to municipalities; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?       NO456E

 

 

REPLY

Madam Speaker,

The debts owed to municipalities by national and provincial government departments remains a serious matter that we are seized with.

The debt owed by organs of state was R6.3 billion as at 31 December 2016 and R9.7 billion as at 31 December 2018 and the debt continue to grow due to accruing interest and insufficient funds allocation by organ of state to service arrears.

 

Some of the reasons include insufficient budget allocations by organs of state to service current year debt and historic debt and general inadequate budgeting for municipal services and property rates by the organ of state.

 

COGTA, in collaboration with Treasury have structures in place to assist municipalities to recover the amounts owed by organs of state and to facilitate the resolution of disputes between organs of state and municipalities.

 

The structures include the provincial intergovernmental debt forums and sessions run by provincial COGTAs and Provincial Treasuries. COGTA also participates in the National Public Works Steering Committee, which focuses on amounts owed by Provincial and National Public Works.

 

The Inter ministerial task team dealing with debts owed by municipalities to Eskom and water boards (IMTT) recommended the installation of electricity and water prepaid metering infrastructure. This will be one of the effective tools to eliminate the municipal debt, as the municipal service will be on prepayment system nationwide.

 

Organs of state are urged to prioritise municipal services in their budgets. We have requested the National Treasury team responsible for monitoring Provincial and National budgets to ensure that municipal services are prioritized in all budgets.

 

These structures discuss the debt owed to the municipalities, evaluate progress on the reconciliation and verification of intergovernmental debts undertaken by municipalities and organs of state, billing challenges, progress on payments and find amicable solution on challenges.

 

I thank you

MINISTRY FOR COOPERATIVE GOVERNANCE AND TRADITIONAL AFFAIRS

REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

 

 

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

QUESTIONS FOR WRITTEN REPLY

QUESTION NUMBER PQ NO 5   

DATE OF PUBLICATION: 25 FEBRUARY 2019

 

Mr J J Dube (ANC) to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

  • In light of the fact that his department has called on mayors and councils to stop unleashing municipal police on informal traders, but to rather find the best ways to work with them because they are key to the development of local economies, what programmes have been put in place by his department to ensure that municipalities support informal traders? NO430E

REPLY:

The informal sector provides employment and incomes to millions of people who otherwise would have no other means of survival. The sector has become the breeding ground of entrepreneurship with families passing on the practical skills from one generation to the other informal business sector. It needs to be nurtured and supported and we are doing so as government.

In order to ensure maximum support provided to informal traders the Department of Cooperative Governance has launched a few programmes.

Municipalities are encouraged to develop clear and realistic policies on supporting and developing informal enterprises to ensure their welfare and growth. This matter was discussed at the last MINMEC with the MECs responsible for local government and the SA Local Government Association.

These programmes are the Revised National Framework for Local Economic Development 2018-2028, the Formalisation of the Informal Economy Programme and the Discussion on Street Trading, Operations of Spaza Shops and Development of bylaws.

 

The Department of Cooperative Governance in collaboration with the Department of Small Business Development have launched a programme to formulate national guidelines on street trading, operation of spaza shops, development of by-laws and to protect South African informal traders. We have noticed a policy gap. Government must move an extra mile to protect the informal business sector, support it and provide dedicated and targeted access to finance that small business can utilize.

 

The programme seeks to address a few issues. One is lawless in the sector where everyone operates a spaza shop or shop without applying for permits and also respect for other bylaws and laws of the land. There is either weak or no municipal bylaw enforcement which causes chaos in some towns and cities.

 

 

 

We need to ensure that by laws or regulations promote entrepreneurship while preventing lawlessness and proliferation of illegal business and trading in illicit goods. Obtaining trading licences for our citizens should be simplified and reinforced by regular inspections to ensure compliance.

 

There is a lack of a uniform approach to the promotion of legal street and township trading and also the protection of South African traders. Government has been confronted with complaints by local traders about being driven out of the sector in townships and other central business district areas in many towns and cities. Government takes this matter seriously and is looking into to find ways of regulating the sector while strengthening local traders as is done in other countries in the African continent and beyond.

 

There is currently no national approach to support municipalities in regulating and developing the sector. We also need to clarify the role of provincial COGTA departments in this new policy proposed policy direction.

                  

I thank you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MINISTRY FOR COOPERATIVE GOVERNANCE AND TRADITIONAL AFFAIRS

REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

 

 

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

QUESTIONS FOR ORAL REPLY

QUESTION NUMBER 2019/32

DATE OF PUBLICATION: 25 FEBRUARY 2019

Mr Z R Xalisa (EFF) to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

Whether he has found that the current budgetary allocation for the local sphere of government is sufficient to deal with the challenges of service delivery faced by local government; if not, what legislative and other proposals has he put in place to ensure that local government is prioritised in the allocation of government budgets.

NO458E

 

REPLY:

Madam Speaker/Chairperson

 

Government prioritises local government as the sphere that is closest to the people. Intensive measures of ensuring the recovery of the sector have been put in place.

 

The approach to local government budgetary allocations is discussed extensively in Budget Forums as well as extended Cabinet meetings including ministers, provincial premiers and the SA Local Government Association.

 

The local government fiscal framework responds to the mandated constitutional assignment of powers and functions of the local government sphere of government. The framework is all the resources available to municipalities to meet their expenditure responsibilities.

 

 

Over the 2019 Medium Term Expenditure Framework period an amount of R414.7 billion is provided to be transferred directly to local government and a further R22.5 billion has been allocated as indirect grants to local government.

 

The direct transfers to local government over the Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) term account for 9 percent of national government‘s non-interest expenditure. When the indirect grants are added to the allocated direct transfers, total spending on local government increases to 9.4 per cent of national government’s non-interest expenditure.

 

The direct transfer allocations to municipalities from the national fiscus is utilized for service delivery and is aligned to the Integrated Development Plans and ultimately service delivery and Budget Implementation Plans of municipalities.

 

The national government also allocates funds to the local government through a variety of conditional grants. These grants fall into two main stream, namely, infrastructure and capacity building support grants. The total value of the conditional grants directly transferred to local government increases from R45.1 billion in 2019/20 to R48.2 billion in 2020/21 and R52.2 billion in 2021/22.

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is important to note that significant fiscal powers are entrenched in Section 229 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa are premised on the notion that the local sphere of government should raise bulk of own revenue from rate on properties (land and buildings), user services charges on services (such as electricity, water, sanitation), and surcharges on fees for services provided by the municipality. Unconditional grants, conditional grants and indirect capacity building support allocations supplement the municipalities’ own revenues to deliver on their constitutionally assigned mandates for the provision of services to their communities.

 

 

The Department of Cooperative Governance will work with the National Treasury to improve the local government fiscal framework, including the local government equitable share formula.

 

We want to refine the methodology used to update the growth estimates of households which will take into account the updated data from Statistics South Africa, and possibly using the district level data.

 

We seek to improve the responsiveness of the formula to the different functions assigned to the districts and local municipalities. This work will depend on the availability of the records of credible official data on powers and functions assigned to each sphere of government. The policy and administrative work taking place at the National Disaster Management Centre (NDMC) could possibly assist the targeting of funding of fire services.

 

COGTA and the National Treasury monitor the implementation financial recovery plans for municipalities in distress and participate in sessions for the development of financial recovery plans.

 

The Department supports municipalities on the management of municipal debt through the development and implementation of simplified revenue plans so that they can generate own revenue better.

 

I thank you

 

MINISTRY FOR COOPERATIVE GOVERNANCE AND TRADITIONAL AFFAIRS

REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

 

 

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

QUESTIONS FOR ORAL REPLY

QUESTION NUMBER PQ NO 6   

DATE OF PUBLICATION: 25 FEBRUARY 2019

Ms N F Shabalala (ANC) to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

How does his department intend to ensure that it will bring in major infrastructure and investment in nonviable municipalities in order to improve job creation‚ economic growth and revenue for the specified municipalities?                NO431E

REPLY:

Madam Speaker/Chairperson,

 

Government has identified 57 municipalities with a potential to boost the economy, in contribution to the President’s economic stimulus package announced in September.

 

They include the eight metropolitan municipalities, six district municipalities and 43 local municipalities. The municipalities account for over 87% of all households living in informal settlements or backyard dwellings and for over 70% of all backlogs in South Africa. They are also the areas in which 84% of the GDP of South Africa is generated. Over 10 000 projects totaling over R57 billion each financial year are presently being implemented in these municipalities. Support to these municipalities to invest in economic recovery is a key focus area for the InterMinisterial Task Team on Service Delivery and its Rapid Response Team.

 

We are talking to various private sector stakeholders in search of funding models to accelerate the refurbishment of faulty infrastructure such as sewerage treatment plans and the connection of bulk water to reticulate water to nearby villages.

 

 

 

We have also begun working on a Municipal Infrastructure Fund to expand infrastructure and refurbish derelict or degenerating infrastructure in municipalities and to support new growth, human settlements and other investments.

 

The Fund will mobilise institutional and Development Finance Institutions, locally and internationally, and respond to new infrastructure development requirements, rehabilitation and renewal of aging infrastructure together with operations and maintenance.

 

A task team comprising experts from the following organisations have been formed: Municipal Infrastructure Support Agent (MISA); DBSA; Banking Association of South Africa (BASA); Association for Savings & Investment South Africa (ASISA), National Treasury, Department of Water and Sanitation, Black Business Council (BBC) and SALGA. The focus of this task team is to come up with a model for infrastructure funding that will also accommodate under-resourced municipalities.

 

 

 

 

A private sector participation model for water and sanitation service delivery has been developed. This model targets those municipalities that, on their own, cannot raise funds from the private sector. The following municipalities have been identified as potential pilot projects: Alfred Nzo, OR Tambo, Ugu, Harry Gwala, Sekhukhune, Mopani, Giyani, uMgungundlovu, Maluti-a-Phofung, Madibeng, Emfuleni, Emalahleni, City of Matlosana, Polokwane, Rustenburg, George, Lekwa and Mangaung.

 

COGTA is also involved in the alignment of Social Labor Plans with the Integrated Development Plans in order to fast-track the stimulation of local economies in mining towns through leveraging of SLP funds. The programme involves reviewing the Social Labour Plans, assisting municipalities where they are not functional and ensuring that SLPs are part of the IDP planning and implementation process.

 

 

I thank you

 

 

 

 

 

MINISTRY

COOPERATIVE GOVERNANCE AND TRADITIONAL AFFAIRS

REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

 

 

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

QUESTION FOR ORAL REPLY

QUESTION NUMBERê20

DATE OF PUBLICATION: 26 FEBRUARY 2019

 

 

ê20.       Mr T M Nkonzo (ANC) to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

What measures has he put in place to ensure the regulation of churches in order to protect ordinary South Africans from the alleged ills that some churches have been perpetuating? NO445E

REPLY:

 

Government is very concerned about the unacceptable practices by some religious leaders. As the House would be aware, in 2017 the CRL Rights Commission released a report titled “Hearings on Commercialisation of Religion and Abuse of People’s Belief Systems”. I have discussed the contents of the report with the CRL Rights Commission and it was also presented to the Cogta Portfolio Committee through which the Commission reports to Parliament.

 

We are seized with the issues raised in the Report and are looking at all options at our disposal, including the possibility of self-regulation and peer review proposed in the Report. We must however emphasise that where unlawful acts are carried out by religious leaders, the law must take its course.

 

We are also mindful of the balance we need to maintain between freedom of religion and also ensuring that people are not abused through unlawful or other practices within certain religious formations.

 

I thank you.

MINISTRY FOR COOPERATIVE GOVERNANCE AND TRADITIONAL AFFAIRS

REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

 

 

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

QUESTION FOR ORAL REPLY

QUESTION NUMBER 2019/7

DATE OF PUBLICATION: 25 MARCH 2019

 

Ms B J Maluleke (ANC) to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

What progress has his department made thus far with its intervention in the (a) Greater Giyani Local Municipality water supply crisis and (b) Emfuleni Local Municipality sanitation crisis?NO432E

 

 

Reply:

 

Madam Speaker/Chairperson,

The communities in Greater Giyani Local Municipality (GGLM) for a number of years have experienced severe water shortages due to deteriorating condition of the bulk water supply, water reticulation and waste water infrastructure serving the area. Government seeks to correct the situation and provide relief.

 

We assembled a Task Team comprising senior officials from the Department of Water and Sanitation, Department of Cooperative Governance, the Municipal Infrastructure Support Agent, Lepelle Northern Water and Mopani District Municipality in September 2018 to attend to the challenges in Giyani. The team has conducted an assessment of outstanding work on the project and developed a four pronged strategy to rescue the project.

 

The Department of Water and Sanitation will implement consequence management using the Special Investigating Unit report, and action will be taken against those who were found to have transgressed the law. Lepelle Northern Water has terminated the contract of LTE, the original service provider that has abandoned the project, which is also locked in a legal dispute with the water board. The Municipal Infrastructure Support Agent is in the process of appointing a professional service provider to assess and cost the outstanding work. The appointment is expected to be concluded in the short term.

The Mopani District Municipality is using its own funding to repair minor damages on the constructed boreholes. We are determined to ensure that the people of Giyani do not become disadvantaged further due to the challenges that arose with this project.

 

The challenges in Emfuleni caused consternation and concern nationwide and a lot is being done to correct the situation with regards to both governance and infrastructure management in the municipality.

 

The Province invoked a Section 139 of the Constitution Intervention in the municipality. A Technical Task Team comprising the Department of Water and Sanitation, Department of Defence, National CoGTA (through MISA), Provincial CoGTA, the East Rand Water Care Company, an Agency of Ekurhuleni Metro and Emfuleni Municipality has been established.

To this end, a Costed Intervention Plan to address pollution of Vaal River Systems has been developed and approved by National Treasury for possible funding. Furthermore, an Implementation Protocol setting out roles and responsibilities of key stakeholders in implementing required interventions to address pollution in the Vaal River System has been developed.

Last year to provide immediate relief, with the support of Ministers of Defence, Finance as well as Water and Sanitation, the SANDF was deployed in Emfuleni and work was undertaken has included cleaning and desludging primary settling tanks, repairing of pump stations in Boitumelo, West Side Park and Evaton Garden as well as the securing of the pump station and waste water treatment works.

 

An amount of R1 billion is required to address pollution of the Vaal River Systems in Emfuleni. The Department of Water and Sanitation has made available an amount of R340million during the 2018/19 and 2019/20 financial years. The remainder of required funding (i.e.R760million) is being discussed with National Treasury.

 

The Emfuleni plan seeks to address in the main the discharge of non-compliant effluent into the Vaal River and the negative environmental and health impact. The Plan must also respond to the restrictions to the socio-economic growth in the area, which is an impediment to investment potential of the province, particularly with regard to Savannah City and River City. These are potential growth points whose development has been stalled due to a moratorium on approval of town planning applications arising from pollution of the Vaal River Systems (VRS) as well as limited bulk infrastructure.

 

We are also looking to effectively deal with the problem of ageing infrastructure within the Sedibeng Region, resulting in high maintenance costs and performance failures, as well as infrastructure vandalism and poor maintenance.

 

I Thank You

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MINISTRY FOR COOPERATIVE GOVERNANCE AND TRADITIONAL AFFAIRS

REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

 

 

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

QUESTIONS FOR ORAL REPLY

QUESTION NUMBER PQ NO 2019/25     

DATE OF PUBLICATION: 25 FEBRUARY 2019

 

  1. Mr M S Shackleton (DA) to ask the Minister of Cooperative   Governance and Traditional Affairs:

What is the time line, including deadlines, of resolving service delivery issues in (a) Ward 8 and (b) Ward 76 that fall under Chief K C Kekana of the Amandebele Ba Lebelo traditional authority in Hammanskraal?NO450E

 

REPLY:

Madam Speaker/Chairperson

My Department is currently investigating the specific service delivery challenges in the mentioned wards, 8 and 76 in Hammanskraal. We are working with the Provincial CoGTA Department and the City of Tshwane to follow up on the question of the Honourable Member.

However, based on our preliminary investigations, the Department is aware that there is a traditional leadership succession dispute at the AmaNdebele Ba Lebelo Traditional Authority in Hammanskraal. The matter is currently before the North Gauteng High Court, and it would therefore not be possible for the department to indicate timeframes for the finalisation of the issues at hand. When the investigations and report is finalised, the Honourable Member will be furnished with the detailed report on the matters asked in his question.

 

 

I thank you.

 

Enquiries:
Musa Zondi
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